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Erika Milo

<a href=”http://westbynorthwest.org/artman/publish/article_634.shtml“>Life in the Wider Household of Being: An Interview with Ursula K. Le Guin</a>

Milo Interviews Le Guin

Northwest writer Ursula K. Le Guin is one of the inspirations for this zine. Her understanding of nature as being, and of humans becoming has transformed the literary landscape. Now we are privileged to present an exclusive interview with her: “Art that preaches or teaches overtly is lessened by the sermon and the lecture; art in the service of an ideology is a servant not a free creature; the artist must assert unconditional freedom of choice and follow thought and passion, not obeying any outer control or conforming to other people’s standards: but art is a social act, and its social function is to affirm community–the human community, and the wider household of being. Paradox, incompatibility, dilemma. So I live there.”
Nov 21, 2003

<a href=”http://westbynorthwest.org/artman/publish/article_415.shtml“>A List of Some Things Collected—Pennies, String, Sealing Wax, Part I</a>

Erika Milo
This essay evokes this time of now and this place of the Northwest and yet is timeless and universal. Here is a unique celebration of seeing nature and we humans as a part of the creation: “The feeling intensified as we moved along the creek-bed, became almost unbearable, aching for conclusion. It was there, the source of all this, or at least the gateway, and none of the others saw—the fallen trunk of an enormous tree, huge beyond imagination: that was all they saw. ..My friend and I wanted to weep. We breathed in silence and saw only him. A King, he was, this great tree—not a God, but a King of otherlands, of the winds and the waters, the movings of the earth.” Part I.
Apr 22, 2003


<a href=”http://westbynorthwest.org/artman/publish/article_420.shtml“>A List of Some Things Collected—Pennies, String, Sealing Wax, Part II</a>

Erika Milo
Seeing God’s face in nature: The wonder of the planets can be found at our feet. Part II continues this essay, a celebration of nature and human where “every sacred spot is merely a gateway, where many worship, but few step through. ..I see the great one that rises there, two yews grown into one, huge and broad, with a mist of night clinging to its branches and the shock of sheer power shaking all through me, and I wonder: how could I have ever missed it? I found the way by not seeking, most of all not thinking. Walk without going; walk with your mind empty and forces will fill it up…”
Apr 22, 2003